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Motility in Osteopathy: From embryology to clinical practice - Alain Auberville
06.03.2019 502 0 Татьяна Пилипенко

Motility in Osteopathy: From embryology to clinical practice - Alain Auberville

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Motility in Osteopathy: From embryology to clinical practice - Alain AubervilleГод выпуска: 2017

Автор: Alain Auberville and Andree Aubin

Жанр: Книги на английском

Формат: PDF

Качество: OCR

Описание: It was in 1984–1985 that, newly qualified in osteopathy and studying at the Société Française d’Enseignement et de Recherche en Énergétique (SFERE), I first came across the osteopath and teacher Alain Ripert, who shared with us his ideas on possible relationships between Chinese traditional medicine and embryology, based on chronology and vital energy flow.
Chinese traditional medicine is based on this flow of energy, its movement, and osteopathy’s foundation is also movement. During embryogenesis, nearly all of the embryo’s structures will move, carried by energy! With these ideas in mind, I wished to find new osteopathic techniques that would make use of the principles of Chinese medicine in my clinical practice. Embryology suits this purpose by combining movement and energy.
I started by looking into embryogenesis and, more precisely, its associated movements, such as the migrations and proliferation of the cells that ultimately make up all the structures of the body, following an unalterable chronology.
The first tests and techniques that I developed based on embryology development were for the digestive system. They have been used on thousands of patients in different clinical contexts, particularly when traditional osteopathic techniques did not deliver the desired results. This intensive use made me realize it was often possible to normalize dysfunctions in a quicker and more efficient way by using these motility techniques. Furthermore, mobility dysfunctions often disappeared following just the motility treatment, implying they were adaptive and not necessarily independent, and that motility could be, in many cases, preferred over mobility.
SFERE had a device to measure electrical potential differences at the acupuncture points, so we were able to verify the positive results of the motility treatment in an objective way, which persuaded me to commit to this approach.
Visceral osteopathy, as taught at SFERE and also in osteopathy schools across Europe and North America, made the development of this concept possible and even helped shape and define it, thanks to the students’ insight and questions.
The embryology-based motility concept then expanded to encompass the urogenital and cardiopulmonary systems, with equally interesting results.
At that time, I questioned the variable results of classical diaphragm treatment techniques. Why did some diaphragm dysfunctions react quickly to spheno-occipital synostosis decompression techniques – so quickly that it might imply a neurological action on the pneumotaxic center – when others did not react at all? How could we intervene directly on the superior centers? Were they responsible for the persistence of some of these dysfunctions?
In the late 1980s, these questions led me to apply the energetic motility concept to the autonomic and central nervous systems. Important embryological movements in the midbrain and pontine flexures were my first concern. Working on the neurological field broadened my osteopathic practice, leading to new reasons for consultation and better results for many of the existing reasons for consultation.
To my great satisfaction, these ‘neuro’ techniques enabled me to lift dysfunctions causing reflex algoneurodystrophy, a painful and disabling condition for which too few effective therapeutic resources exist. The patients who were treated and also I myself were surprised by how effective the treatment of neurological motility losses was and how quickly the patients recovered. Some of them even experienced the remineralization of bones as a consequence of the treatment, which made me realize that the line between structure and function is certainly thinner than their definitions imply. At this time the possibilities for osteopathy expanded for me.
Some long-standing questions about the sacrum remained unanswered: why did its felt movement seem to be much more extensive than its theoretical counterpart, which is supposed to be only a mirror of cranial movement? How to explain the mechanical contradiction in the osteopathic explanation of whiplash? The study of the third and fourth weeks of embryological development, in which the caudal part of the body undergoes a lot of movement – movement named, in this work, caudal plication – gave me some answers. If the fold formed by the unrolling of the inferior part of the embryo was perceivable, and understanding it was able to lead to new treatments, why wouldn’t it be the same with the superior part of the body’s movements, such as the one that leads the heart to its place in the thorax? This is how, in the early 1980s, the idea of thoracic and caudal plication came to life, and was later refined by clinical experimentation and theoretical analysis.
Working on energy progressively made its way into both my mind and my practice, forming a coherent system the implementation of which followed a clear protocol and chronology based on the steps of human development and on the neurological pathways maintaining physical health. This system might seem to be far from traditional osteopathy at first; however, it follows the basic concept of osteopathic movement and its underlying principles, requiring only a questioning and deepening of knowledge to extend their essence.
The direction of this work evolved through clinical experimentation, discussions with a few enthusiastic colleagues, and mostly thanks to the positive feedback given by successfully treated patients. Some of these cases will be covered briefly in Chapter 10, and illustrate the various potential effects of the proposed techniques. I am thankful to my patients, who taught me so much; their continued trust is my most treasured reward.
I hope you take as much pleasure in the study of this work as I did.

Contents

«Motility in Osteopathy»

Theoretical Considerations

  • Field of practice and basic osteopathic principles
  • The organism’s energetic functions
  • Embryological motility model
  • The Sutherland model
  • Other osteopathic works based on the theory of embryology
  • Types of pain caused by motility losses
  • Considerations for palpatory learning

Embryology-Based Motility

  • Flexion and extension dysfunctions: definitions
  • Types of motility dysfunction
  • Evaluation of motility dysfunctions
  • Normalization of motility dysfunctions

Thoracic and Caudal Plications

  • Embryological generalities
  • Motility movements and tests for thoracic and caudal plications
  • Motility dysfunctions of thoracic and caudal plications
  • Normalization of thoracic and caudal plications
  • Motility movement and test of lateral plications
  • Motility dysfunction of lateral plications
  • Normalization of the lateral plications
  • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
  • Osteopathic considerations

Nervous System

  • Embryological generalities
  • First neural tube fold
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Third neural tube fold
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
    • Osteopathic considerations for combined first - and third-fold work
  • Parasympathetic component of the first fold: lateral expansion
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Tentorium cerebelli
  • Cranial nerve nuclei and cerebellum
    • Cranial nerve nuclei
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
    • Cerebellum
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
  • Medulla oblongata, spinal cord, neural crest, and ganglia
    • General embryological movement of the spinal cord
    • Spinal cord
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Medulla oblongata
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
    • Neural crest and ganglia
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
  • Nerve plexuses
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Central nervous system: cerebral hemispheres
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
    • Further considerations

Psychoneuroimmune-Endocrine System

  • Endocrine System
    • Hypophysis
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Pineal gland (epiphysis cerebri)
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Thyroid
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
  • Immune system
    • Thymus
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Spleen
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
      • Osteopathic considerations

Cardiopulmonary System

  • Embryological generalities
  • Heart, and serous and fibrous pericardia
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Pulmonary system
    • Embryological movement
    • Lungs
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Pleurae
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations

Digestive System

  • Embryological generalities
  • Neurological regulation of the intestinal tract
    • Segmental vertebral/costal level
    • Links with the cranial base and the jugular foramen
    • Links with the sacrum
    • Walls of the viscera and organs
  • Esophagus
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Stomach
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Liver
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Duodenum
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Gallbladder, upper and lower bile ducts, and exocrine pancreas
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Endocrine pancreas
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Small intestine
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Colon
    • Embryological movement
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
    • Osteopathic considerations

Urogenital System

  • Embryological generalities
  • Urology
    • Kidney
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement of the definitive kidney and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Motility movement of the first and second kidneys and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Bladder
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Ureters
  • Genital organs
    • Embryological generalities
    • Uterus
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Links with traditional Chinese medicine
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Gonads: ovaries and testicles
      • Embryological movement
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Normalization
      • Osteopathic considerations
    • Prostate
      • Motility movement and test
      • Motility dysfunction
      • Osteopathic considerations

Musculoskeletal System

  • Embryological generalities
    • Vertebral column and ribs
    • Limbs
  • General vertebral column, notochord, and vertebral segments
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Ribs
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Upper limb
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunctions
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Lower limb
    • Motility movement and test
    • Motility dysfunction
    • Normalization
    • Osteopathic considerations
  • Cranial bones

Clinical Intervention Protocol for the Motility Model

  • The first three steps of the protocol
  • Reasons for consultation: musculoskeletal system
  • Reasons for consultation: visceral sphere
  • Reasons for consultation: cranial field
Index

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